Ruthless Jabiru and Decibel together in concert for one night only

Featured

PRESS RELEASE
London chamber orchestra Ruthless Jabiru welcomes into its fold fellow Australian musicians Decibel New Music Ensemble for a massed finale to the latter’s forthcoming UK tour.

The two ensembles will unite for a programme of graphic-, text- and traditionally-notated music performed by an orchestra of entirely low instruments. The event will take place in the unique subaquatic surrounds of the Grand Entrance Hall at the Brunel Museum on 02 December 2022 as part of the UK/Australia Season 2021-22.

Continue reading

Inside Music: Composer Soosan Lolavar explores deep musical connections

Soosan Lolavar is a British-Iranian composer and researcher. Today on Inside Music, she discovers how composers like Janǎćek, Philip Glass and Ligeti often revisit their best ideas. 

Soosan also describes the way her recent treatment for cancer has changed her relationship with music, forging deeper connections with the works of Mahler, Sibelius and Beethoven.

And she also finds how a performance by the legendary Iranian singer Mohammadreza Shajarian conjures moments of freedom, wild horses and the folk traditions of Sicily. 

A series in which each week a musician explores a selection of music – from the inside.

A Tandem Production for BBC Radio 3

This time last year we were still giddy from our Crowdfunder success! Thanks so much again to everyone who’s supported our album collaboration with Soosan and Nonclassical so far.

For all those interested in our progress—Soosan speaks openly about her year here for Inside Music, while I continue my fundraising crusade to support our sizeable project team..

We hope to regale you all with a 2022 release! In the meantime, our Crowdfunder remains open for donations of any/every size

Review: Bushra El-Turk and Eleanor Knight, Silk Moth; Grimeborn, 9 August 2019

Originally posted at Tempo: a Quarterly Review of New Music:

tempo.jpg

When Eleanor Knight began researching her libretto for Silk Moth, she had to decide how to frame an opera about honour violence. Meeting women whose lives it had ruptured through the Iranian and Kurdish Women’s Rights Organisation, she confronted the usual images that accompany the dozen-or-so honour killings per year in the UK media. Between the ‘old, faded school photos’ that illustrate victimhood and the male perpetrators with ‘blankets over their heads … shoved into waiting police cars’, she saw a gulf of painful complexity. ‘What’, she asks, ‘of the mothers?’.1
Continue reading