Diverse cast unite in Bushra El-Turk’s Silk Moth

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Ruthless Jabiru welcomes lauded British-Egyptian mezzo Camille Maalawy to perform the principal role of Mother in the orchestra’s forthcoming production Silk Moth for Grimeborn Festival 2019.

Maalawy has won critical acclaim for her passion and expressiveness across Arabic and Sephardic song in addition to continuing success on the opera and concert stage. Her Continue reading

Ruthless Jabiru to make Grimeborn Festival debut with all-female programme of music

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© Hannah Quinlivan, Immobilised (drawing performance with movement). L-R: Louise Keast, Shikara Ringdahl. Photographer: Alex Hobba. Used with permission. Image note: image must be accompanied with artist’s credit

London chamber orchestra Ruthless Jabiru will deliver Silk Moth, its first fully-staged production for fringe opera stalwart Grimeborn Festival at London’s Arcola Theatre over a five performance season from 09-11 August 2019.

A story of vulnerability and complicity told through the music of Bushra El-Turk, Liza Lim and Cassandra Miller, Ruthless Jabiru’s Silk Moth will examine the complex tragedies of honour crime, family violence and female (dis)empowerment in Britain and beyond.
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Silk Moth and honour

Originally posted at eleanorknight2016 :

Template 258x173 copy.jpg“What would you say to your dead wife or daughter if she were still here?”

“I would say that I acted out of love, and I know that she would understand.”

This  exchange appears in Witold Szablowski’s collection of reportage from Turkey, The Assassin from Apricot City and simply and devastatingly illustrates the complexity of ‘honour’.

Honour, as I understand it as I sit here tapping away in East Sussex, is about acting with ethical integrity, with an awareness of a higher purpose, of doing the best one can as a human being.

But what about ‘honour’ so destructive that it leads to the violent deaths of 5,000 women a year worldwide, including about a dozen in the UK?
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Lecturer’s libretto returns to the stage

Originally posted at University of Brighton :

Template 258x173.jpgAn opera featuring a libretto written by a University of Brighton lecturer is to be performed in London in August

17 June 2019

Eleanor Knight, who teaches on the Creative Writing MA, wrote the libretto for the short opera Silk Moth which premiered at the Nour Festival of Arts in London in 2015.

Ruthless Jabiru’s Silk Moth runs at the Arcola Theatre in Hackney from 09-11 August. Part of the theatre’s Grimeborn season, the production weaves together Arabic and Western music traditions and explores honour crime, family violence and female (dis)empowerment in Britain and beyond.
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Mixtape #006

Arcola announces 2019 Grimeborn Opera Festival

Originally posted at Arcola Theatre :

Template 258x173.jpgPress Releases / 23 May 2019

Arcola Theatre has announced the 16 productions that make up the 2019 Grimeborn Opera Festival.

The festival, which is returning for its thirteenth successive year, features bold new versions of classic operas, rarely-seen and long-forgotten works, and brand new pieces from some of the most exciting up-and-coming opera artists. £12 tickets are available for every single show in the season.

Following their smash-hit The Rape of Lucretia (Winner of the 2019 Off West End Award for Best Opera Production), Julia Burbach and Peter Selwyn reunite for a thrilling new take on Wagner’s Das Rheingold. Arcola produces the first London performances of Continue reading

Ruthless Jabiru, King’s College London / Arditti Quartet, Wigmore Hall review – delicate, dedicated modernism

Originally posted at The Arts Desk :

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Compelling refugee-themed concert from Australian ensemble and radical new sounds from avant-garde veterans

by

★★★★✩

Ruthless Jabiru is an all-Australian chamber orchestra based in London. It is the brainchild of conductor Kelly Lovelady, who in recent years has geared the ensemble towards political and environmental concerns. Previous projects have highlighted environmental damage in central Australia and the campaign to end sponsorship by oil companies in the arts sector. For Saturday’s concert, Lovelady and her colleagues turned their attentions to the humanitarian crisis of refugees setting out for Australia by sea.
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Program note: The Drowners

Originally posted at andrewford.net.au :

Andrew Ford (b. 1957)
The Drowners (2009–15)
songs for baritone, percussion, harmonium, celesta, harp and strings

This sequence of songs began as a commission from the West Australian Symphony Orchestra for a single song for the baritone Teddy Tahu Rhodes. ‘A Dream of Drowning’ was first performed by those forces, conducted by Paul Daniel, on 12 March 2010, but it seemed incomplete, as though it was only the start of something. So I added five more songs to make the present work.

The Drowners was composed for Morgan Pearse to sing with two orchestras – Ruthless Jabiru in London, under their conductor Kelly Lovelady, and Camerata in Brisbane, under Brendan Joyce. The work was funded by a project fellowship from the Australia Council for Continue reading

Ruthless Jabiru – music in solidarity

Originally posted at Platforma Arts + Refugees Network :

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By Kelly Lovelady

This weekend I will conduct a musical programme in solidarity with our brothers and sisters seeking asylum by sea in the beautiful chapel of King’s College London.

My ensemble Ruthless Jabiru is a London chamber orchestra dedicated to humanitarian stories. A dual advocacy for contemporary composers and Activist narratives reflects our citizen duty as artists to engage ever more deeply with the world around us; giving voice to the truths of our allies, interrogating the accountability of our leaders and championing solidarity in all its forms.

As I collect my thoughts on another International Women’s Day I have been reflecting on the cult of familiarity and how deep it runs. In concert music culture we are dogged by this Continue reading

The Growing Edge: Ruthless Jabiru to examine asylum policy

Originally posted at Loud Mouth :

Template 258x173.jpgIn a time when democracy and basic principles of justice are precarious, there are musicians who are finding ways to use their music to support the greater good.

Written by: Kelly Lovelady

Ruthless Jabiru, a London chamber orchestra of Australian musicians, will use its forthcoming performance to foster a revival of empathy towards refugees.

Centred around the world premiere of The Drowners, a major new orchestral song cycle by British-Australian composer Andrew Ford, the project will honour tidal forces and the many lives lost seeking asylum by sea. This focal work will be framed by the music of composers Nicole Lizée, Rosalind PageWolfgang Rihm and Fausto Romitelli to conjure a muted submarine dreamscape: a dark world of distorted gravity, out of body experience  Continue reading